The Tight Balance of LNG In Indonesia

image_print

Last week, Indonesian state energy firm Pertamina admitted that the country may become a net importer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by 2020, as soaring demand in the populous western islands dwarf domestic supplies from the energy-rich east. This isn’t the first time that this scenario has been mooted – the BMI Group projects the tipping point to be 2022, while Wood Mackenzie expects LNG demand in Indonesia to hit 7 mtpa by 2020 – with the fundamental structural shift always being the same: rising demand from a growing population and industrial base versus declining output at the country’s domestic gas fields.

As a country, Indonesia has some 1.6% of the world’s total gas reserves, according to the BP Statistical Review. In theory, it should not be in a situation where it is short of gas. The reality is though, that Indonesia is a country of two halves – the gas-deficit west, where the islands of Sumatra and Java represent nearly three-quarters of demand, and the gas-surplus east, where remote areas in Kalimantan, Papua, Maluku and Nusa Tenggara churn out plenty of natural gas. Bridging the two is tough. As an archipelago, Indonesia cannot opt for a nation-wide pipeline network; even within the country, domestic liquefaction and regasification facilities are required to move natural gas from producing areas in the east to consuming areas in the west…

 

Click Here For Remainder of Article 

Posted in: Opinion

About the Author:

Post a Comment

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.